Sand your project with progressively finer grits of sandpaper. Sanded the second time once dried for several days, wiped with varsol cloth again & recoated. If some remain, re-sand the furniture. The streaks are still there. What I think happened is that I either didn't get all the sanding dust of before the second coat, or I screwed up one of the early coats when applying the poly. And all polyurethane will yellow. Theres a trick I have learned for any poly product that works wonders with your finish. Then after that apply 2-3 coats between sanding sessions. When it’s clean, mark out the section with masking tape. Start by washing the area with soapy water. Please help! However, the quality and protection of most film building finishes (such as polyurethane, lacquer, and shellac) goes up exponentially on the first few coats (e.g., there’s a huge improvement in durability and moisture excluding effectiveness from coat #1 to coat #2, … For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. If there are ridges you probably want to sand everything flush. Thanks eagleeye and cabinetman. Typically, two to three coats are used with sanding in between coats to even them out. – Gloria May 27 '13 at 16:08 Turned out great, no streaks. As a protective measure I've started down the path of putting some coats of a Satin finish polyurethane on them. Additionally, once the protective finish has been broken by a scratch, the wood underneath can be irreparably damaged by moisture or deepening of the scratch in the wood. Then, sand the area with a fine-grit scratch pad to get rid of the old coat. To fix this you'll need to buff the floors really well and then recoat them. Typically, two to three coats are used with sanding in between coats to even them out. Hardwood floors in a home create charm, style and resale value with very little maintenance. I used 2 coats. Scrub out the streaks, then reapply the stain liberally. Brush on polyurethane with a paintbrush in the direction of the wood grain. That should be the equivalent of 1 coat of standard poly. These particles can get caught under the finish and ruin it.Apply the polyurethane finish lightly to the brush, making sure to wipe off any extra. How to Fix It: Wipe it with a bit of mineral spirits and buff well. Clean the wood very thoroughly to remove sanding dust before each new coat of polyurethane, using a vacuum (if available) and a tack cloth. However, there is a way to remedy these flaws without undoing a day's work. Check your applicator carefully, and remember what I said before about always using a new applicator for your final coat. (I normally use too little.) Wrap the sponge in a clean … http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=1269, VerticalScope Inc., 111 Peter, Suite 901, Toronto, Ontario, M5V 2H1, Canada. However, the quality and protection of most film building finishes (such as polyurethane, lacquer, and shellac) goes up exponentially on the first few coats (e.g., there’s a huge improvement in durability and moisture excluding effectiveness from coat #1 to coat #2, … Thanks again HerrBag! One of you can apply the stain, and the other wipe off the excess to get an even color. Apply 3-4 coats before your first sanding, that should seal in your stain. There is no quick fix for this, what I recommend is that you have the refinishers come back and screen and coat the floor. How to Apply Polycrylic without Streaks, Brush Strokes or Bubbles How to Avoid Brush Strokes and Streaks. When it comes to finishing furniture or hardwood floors, polyurethane is the key to protecting and preserving the stain.